Colby Cheese Days | World Cheese Curd Throwing Competition

The word colby is Norse in origin. It’s logical, then, colby cheese is just the kind of cheese that might appeal to the Scandinavian palate I’ve referenced before. Colby cheese is a mild cheese, similar to cheddar (but skips the cheddaring process).

The cheese is celebrated every year with a three-day festival in the city of the same name. Colby, Wisconsin, is found in the heart of the state, off of Highway 29.

colby wisconsin

colby wisconsin building

If you’ve never been to a rural Wisconsin, small town festival, I will try my best to explain it to you. But truly, you’ll just have to experience one for yourself to determine if it’s something you can appreciate. It’s probably not for everyone. If you are looking for health food, this isn’t your festival. The festival goers will probably know you’re a tourist and might even ask what you’re doing there. They will look at you strangely when you pull out your D-SLR and ask if you can take photos of them deep-frying. (To be fair, they were friendly and some welcomed photos, but some thought I was a bit off). There will be a parade of local princess floats, John Deere machinery, and polka groups. Don’t be alarmed if you see a Miss Some-Nearby-Small-Town wearing a camouflage dress. I would never personally do it, but to each princess her own. There will also be a town coloring contest, a glee club performance (sang the Killers, ha!), a tractor pull (I didn’t really understand the concept before, either, so don’t worry), fair rides, and certainly food.

colby cheese sign

colby cheese days

coloring contest colby

colby cheese days

colby cheese parade

colby cheese parade

colby wisconsin tractor pull

This woman was my hero for the day. Don’t believe she won, but she was the only woman I saw competing, so we rooted for her.

colby, wisconsin tractor pull

colby wisconsin tractor pull

And as you guessed, in Colby, there will be cheese curds. The way God intended them to be eaten. White and squeaky, the lightly and freshly battered, and fried until beautifully golden. This was almost reason enough to go.

deep fried cheese curds colby wisconsin

Don’t leave Wisconsin without eating them. Unless you’re a vegan. Or have celiac disease. Or aren’t going to eat a salad as your next meal.

colby cheese day festival

colby cheese days festival

Sure, I’m a sucker for a cheesy festival of any nature, but what really convinced us to make the trip was the opportunity to take part in a World Championship. I’m not kidding. For two dollars, you can say you competed in a world championship of cheese curd throwing. You can’t make this up. Once I heard about this, I had to go. Am I strange? Apparently. We were probably the only to people eagerly awaiting the beginning of the competition. It began with very little fanfare. Despite little fanfare, the winners’ trophies were on display.

trophies colby cheese throwing

I lined up shamelessly among the 11-year-olds holding their parents’ money. I prepared. I asked the 11-year-old behind me for tips. And then the organizer of the event. What were the tips I received? I’m not telling. In case I return next year :)

colby cheese curd throwing

Participants are classed according to sex and age and allowed to throw as many curds as they are willing to pay for. Because things were slow going, my sister and I were the only two in our age group for a while. And I went first.

colby cheese curd throw

If you look really closely, you can see the white blur in the air. My throw landed in bounce, meaning I was on the board. Correct, folks, I led a world championship. At least for a while.

Sister went next and came close.

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Sadly, we had other commitments that evening, so had to leave before the end of the competition. Before the event, I had pictured crowds gathered around cheering for local shot put champions. Nothing of the sort. Which made me feel a little easier about leaving earlier.

I’m certain I didn’t win. My throw wasn’t my best, and the competition was supposed to last for a long time. Some other lady between the ages to 19-40 had to have launched that glorious, round curd farther than I had. I even heard the woman next to me trash talking my distance saying she has “got to be able to beat that one!” Alas, I hope for society’s sake that someone in the group of several hundred people had a better arm.

Like an Olympian without a medal, I went home empty-handed.

I Never Knew: Devil’s Lake State Park | East Bluff Trail and Parfrey’s Glen

I have pet peeves. One of these is when beautiful natural areas become tourist areas full of random attractions which overshadow the natural beauty which drew people in the first place.

It’s fine that Wisconsin Dells and the Baraboo area have a lot of water parks. I get it. It’s fun to go (or at least must be for some). But I can’t imagine going to the area and only shopping and visiting water parks. It really has some beautiful scenery, and we only had time to scratch the surface.

On our way home after visiting Madison, we stopped into Devil’s Lake State Park outside of Baraboo, Wisconsin. The park entrance fee is seven dollars per vehicle. And then you can swim and picnic and hike to your heart’s content. (Paddle boats and canoes are available for rent in the park as well).

devils lake state park wisconsin

We went on two short hikes. The first, East Bluff Trail, came in at 1.8 miles. This trail starts from a parking area and is a steady climb for the first bit. After that, it skirts along the bluff around the lake (I guess we know why it’s named what it is, huh?), offering wonderful views of large boulders and the lake itself.

devils lake state park wi

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devils lake rock face

After hiking trail one, we headed toward the beach for a picnic. The area is full of tables. I was happy to see so many in use, especially for a Wednesday! Many vacationing families.

devils lake state park wisconsin

devils lake state park wisconsin

devils lake state park wisconsin

After lunching, we headed toward the eastern section of the park, or Parfrey’s Glen. I had never heard of this while growing up, but learned of its existence thanks to Pinterest. Oh, Internet, you can be nice sometimes.

The trail was less crowded than the trail by the lake; we crossed paths with maybe four other groups of hikers. The ages of hikers ranged from the very young (about 4, I’d say) to the senior. It’s a super short trail, coming in at .7 miles, but does require some balance and rock maneuvering. If you wear a solid pair of water shoes and don’t worry about getting your feet wet, the trail becomes much easier.

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

The hike along the way is all right, but once you reach the gorge, it’s truly an experience. The moss-covered walls will dwarf you and your hiking companion, and you’ll be in awe of the strength of glaciers.

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

 

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

Do you see sister?

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

The trail ends at a small pool and waterfall. We timed it right, meaning we had the waterfall all to ourselves for about fifteen minutes. Although the hike wasn’t really long enough to merit a snack break, we decided to enjoy the view and a few almonds at the same time.

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin waterfall

Eventually, we knew we had to return, retracing our steps to the trailhead.

parfrey's glen devils lake state park, wisconsin

This stop was another one of those “surely I would have seen this while I lived here” experiences. I’ve had many experiences that remind me of my childhood, but many “discoveries” during my month here. I really do like Wisconsin. The lakes, the rolling hills, the indie folk revival, the fish fries (don’t always have to be fried!), and countless other items. There really is a lot to see. You east- and west-coasters can fly over if you want to, but I think you’ll be missing out.

Only in Wisconsin | A Visit to New Glarus

Much to my mother’s chagrin (I think she’d want me to note it), I have taken a liking to beer. This liking manifests itself in a way that people usually associate with oenophiles. I like to try roll the roasted barley between my fingers, slowly savor a unique craft beer, enjoy fruity beer concoctions, sample a flight of mini-glasses, tour the actual breweries, see hops growing in the field, and learn about the return of craft beer. Others can drink until full on the brand of the Clydesdales (funny commercials, but a tasteless drink), I’ll stick to one craft brew (and pay twice as much for it).

new glarus brewery tasting glasses

This means that I tend to find myself surrounded with yuppies, hipsters, and idealists more than the biker crowd. Instead of brawls, there’s generally a discussion of what qualifies a stout as “imperial.” That said, although wine connoisseurs and beer  connoisseurs can overlap, there is one huge difference.  It’s okay not to know. Brewers and home brewers never seem to put on airs.  We all know that wine comes with an [albeit unnecessary] air of sophistication and pretension.*Beer, not so much.

Okay, moving on. When younger sister agreed to take a southern Wisconsin road trip with me, I asked if she’d be interested in visiting the New Glarus Brewery. The New Glarus Brewery was started in 1993, started making craft beers from all natural ingredients, and decided to sell regionally (only within the state/not for the mass market). Since then, the brewery has been recognized for its accomplishments time and time again. Within the state, where you see “Only in Wisconsin” banners, you can guess that you’ll be able to find a New Glarus. Combining my interests in good beer with my love for my home state seemed like a logical idea. My sister agreed to join.

new glarus brewery tasting room

From Madison, New Glarus is only a half an hour drive. Skip the small brewery you see at first, and continue on to the new place. The huge place. The beautiful hilltop setting.

The new brewery is open and comes with a tasting room (3.50 for a small souvenir glass that you can fill three times with samples), a beautiful garden, a gift shop, and a spot for buying bottled beer. The tours are self-guided. I assume that once things are finished in the new place, there will be at least some signage or informational plaques to explain a bit more of what’s happening. Still, it’s pretty impressive.

On the way in, you’re greeted by the hops garden.

new glarus hops

And then you roll up to what looks like a little Swiss village.

new glarus brewery

But with people posing in front of it.

new glarus brewery

Head on in. The self-guided tour is free. It starts with a display of some of the brewery’s accomplishments.

new glarus

Then you’ll see the machinery. Beautiful, huh?

new glarus brewery tour

And once you’re done with that, move on to the tasting. The specialty fruit beers were available, as well as the usual Moon Mans and Spotted Cows, etc. Unfortunately, I think we were a bit early to try their sour beers, which are now out. I didn’t see any in the depot either.

new glarus brewery

We took our samples outside when it wasn’t raining. The garden was really neat. The vines haven’t quite covered the abbey “ruins” yet, but I imagine that in a couple years, it will look even more inviting.

new glarus brewery beer garden

new glarus brewery beer garden

new glarus brewery beer garden

new glarus brewery beer garden

new glarus brewery beer garden

new glarus brewery beer garden

new glarus brewery beer garden

The experience was great. I loved the Guinness brewery tour and even Beau’s, but this has been my favorite brewery visit yet. It definitely caters to a tourist experience, and I’m certainly biased–it being Wisconsin and all–but it was laid back, tasty, and fun. (Just needs to be a bit more informative and we’re set!)

After visiting the brewery, we decided to take a gander into the town of New Glarus. Were you wondering why the New Glarus Brewery went with a Swiss look? The town of New Glarus is known as Little Switzerland. The building were built in the Swiss style, and German is everywhere you look.

new glarus wisconsin swiss architecture

new glarus wisconsin swiss architecture

new glarus wisconsin swiss architecture

new glarus wisconsin swiss architecture

The town probably merited a bit more of our time. It looks like a nice place to spend a day or an afternoon. Unfortunately, we didn’t know that before we visited and hadn’t budgeted the necessary time. Next time, I guess!

*I wish it weren’t there, and I assume in places where it is simply part of the culture, and every Thomas, Richard et Henri (Get it?! The French Tom, Dick, and Harry!) has learned about wine production since they were children, it’s not impressive to correctly pronounce names of wine. 

A Summer Fling: Two Days in Madison, Wisconsin

madison, wi state street

I don’t even know how many times I went to Madison as a child and teenager. I have a vague memory of roaming a street market with Mrs. Brown, my elementary and high school music teacher, during a music listening contest trip. My fascination with street jewelry began then. One of the best weeks of my childhood was also spent in Madison, staying with my friend and her great-aunt. We went to an orchestra concert, ate fresh peaches for the first time, went to the market, toured museums, visited the campus, hung out with some of the smartest and most inspiring women I’ve been around, and learned what makes a good potsticker. I also have high school memories of many-a-basketball tournament (from the stands, let’s be real), state forensics, band trips, and youth group trips.

state street madison wisconsin

Growing up in Wisconsin, I always saw Madison as the state’s cultural center. We never seemed to find our way to Milwaukee (excepting one Rube Goldberg trip, a story my older sister and I love to tell…), only Madison. I was also certain that I’d go to university there, and probably would have, except the move to South Dakota threw a kink in my in-state tuition plans. So while I’ve seen a lot of great things and places since high school, I never got to explore the city of Madison as an adult.

madison wi coffeeshop

Thankfully, I was able to convince my younger sister into joining me on a road trip this summer. It was short, but never felt hectic. I really enjoyed our time, our meals, our general lack of agenda (besides the day trip to New Glarus). Somehow the city, governmenty capital that it is, remains just weird and laid back enough. Guess a large university might have something to do with that. Anyway, downtown is flanked by two lakes, state street offers unique shopping, and the capitol building serves as the city’s compass.

My favorite food stops were Forequarter and Batch Bakehouse, but we also enjoyed Crandall’s Peruvian and the Great Dane Pub. Besides eating, we mostly strolled. In the evening we wandered to Union Terrace, naturally, where everyone else seemed to wander as well. Lovely sunset. And good ice cream.

madison

great dane pub madison

Sister graciously bore the brunt of my photographer burden.

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madison capitol

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madison capitol

madison capitol

madison

madison wi chalkboard

madison wi building

madison wisconsin state street architecture

pastees madison state street

crandalls madison

crandall's madison

crandall's madison peruvian

madison state street

madison state street

madison state street

I should mention that while in the lovely little bakery below, I overheard a young woman and her mother speaking in French, complete with Quebecois accents. I was timid, but couldn’t resist striking up a conversation :) Montréal me manque déjà !

bakery state street madison

I’m collecting evidence that Quebec and Wisconsin are meant for each other. Here’s a children’s book from the bookstore:

canadiens book

forequarter madison comte cheese

fleur de lys plate

forequarter madison

forequarter madison quail

forequarter madison market veggies

union terrace sunset

union terrace sunset

batch bakehouse

As you can tell, we liked it. Madison and I missed our chance for a college romance. But we did manage to sneak in a two-day summer fling. I’ll take what I can get.

madison state street

From Dairy to Cherry | Door County Day 3

Check out previous posts to view our Door County fish boil and sailing excursions.

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Our final day in Door County seemed to be the busiest of all. Somehow, we still managed to squeeze it in while still feeling like we were on vacation. The first half of the day was spent on the beach, but the second half was spent talking agriculture (viticulture is agriculture!) and farming. I am home.

We started early, heading to Whitefish Dune State Park ($7 entry fee) and Cave Point County Park.

Dad and I made our way along the Red Trail (that’s the actual, creative name) to the largest sand dune of Old Baldy. The round trip hike from the parking lot totaled 2.8 miles and was an easy path. We saw a few trail runners along the way. Mom decided to take advantage of the beach time.

whitefish  dunes door county

whitefish dunes

whitefish dunes old baldy

whitefish dunes hike

whitefish dunes door county

cave point door county

Cave Point County Park was much more impressive than we were expecting. The three of us found ourselves wandering down the rocky beach for about 45 minutes before we realized how far we’d walked.

cave point door county

cave point door county

cave point door county

cave point door county

cave point door county

cave point door county

Mom went rock climbing.

cave point door county

door county beach

After wandering on the beach, we chose one of the several wineries in Door County to visit. Our stipulation was that we needed to actually be able to walk in the vineyard. Simon Creek Winery fit the bill.

door county winery

It’s funny/sad that people feel they have to pretend to know what they’re doing when tasting wine. I don’t know much about it. Not even enough to comfortably pretend. I don’t even swirl with confidence. But it’s still fun to walk in vineyards and ask questions. We might not know to ask about hints of oak, but we can ask about growing seasons and harvests.

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simon creek vineyards

simon creek vineyard

I bought a gift bottle of port for the husband who is busy working in Montreal. And then obviously lurked in the vines with it.

With beaches, lighthouses, sailing, wineries, and fish boils off the list, we had to find cherries to round the trip out. Unfortunately, we didn’t have any time to research where we should go for cherries and we weren’t sure if it’d be worth driving around without direction to find them, especially since we were on the early cusp of the season.

But then we saw this stand. Complete with an orchard.

door county cherry stand

And we chatted with the lovely woman below who told us they had no tart cherries on offer (the DC specialty), but the sweet cherries on her other property had just been picked for the first time this season.

The woman and her family also sell some of the other produce from their farm at the store. We talked about soil types, organic certification requirements, and generational farming. We also learned about the agriculture visa program in the county, which allows agriculture students from abroad to gain experience working for the year.

cherries

door county cherry stand

cherries door county

Our final planned stop was at a fully-operational dairy farm, doubling as an educational farm. There’s a dairy bar and petting zoo, but also a huge cow, which my aunt said we had to stop at. We were a little nervous we wouldn’t be able to find this cow-that-you-will-know-when-you-see, but alas, we saw it.

door county farm

Really, without the cow, it’d still be a neat stop, particularly with children, but fine for anyone wanting to buy local dairy and cherry products at the shop.

door county farm

door county farm

door county farm

Finally, with cherries, wine and local dairy products in hand, we only needed to stop for lunch before leaving for our return drive across the state.

Mom had been eyeing a food truck near our motel since our arrival. The food truck has a definitively hipster vibe to it, and Dad was more than amused by the macabre doll head attached to the front. So much so that he mentioned it to the owner, who had to find a way to explain its presence. Ah, but hip cannot be explained. It seemed like the perfect way to cap off our time, especially considering that we’d already made connections within the local hipster community the night before. We didn’t even flinch when we read the “Sturgeon Buena” sign in the window. 

food truck sturgeon bay

sturgeon bay food truck

I loved our time in Door County. It was hard to believe that none of us had visited before. It was so Wisconsin, yet had its very own distinct feel. Sure, it’s touristy. But I figure we know why now.

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Now that I’ve got these recaps finished, I’m just getting my Madison sister road trip photos sorted! Look for those soon!

Skipper for a Day | Door County Day 2

We went to bed early on our first night in Sturgeon Bay, I promise. But we were still a little slow at starting our day two. We read the news, had some coffee at the motel, and chatted with Linda (the all-around helpful employee). There was a first breakfast. And then there was a second breakfast.

Welcome to Al Johnson’s.

al johnsons door county

Or the restaurant with the goat on the grass roof. And the Swedish pancakes. And the meatballs. And the Norwegian goat cheese. And a butik with everything Danish, Swedish, or Norwegian you never knew you needed. Doesn’t everyone need Dalecarlian horse dishcloths? Anyway, the restaurant is super fun. Your waitresses will be dressed traditionally; your waiters in polos and khakis. I told the owner the waiters needed to wear something more cumbersome to even the score. I don’t think he agreed, but laughed politely anyway.

al johnsons

al johnsons

coffee

Be sure to try the lingonberry jam and the Norwegian cheese. Can’t find these everywhere, so I was thrilled. If you order the Scandinavian cheese platter, be sure that you have the dark cheese. Ours was missing. I was feeling quite assertive and inquired. It’d just been accidentally left off and the waiter rectified the error quickly.

al johnsons lingenberry

norwegian goat cheese

Glenn and Kirsten, I purchased a block for us to share. It always reminds me of when you returned from Europe as blissful newlyweds. :)

swedish meatballs with eggs

swedish pancakes with door county cherries

The wait to eat was a bit long (no worries, breakfast served all day), meaning we had no time to waste to make it in time for our afternoon excursion.

Whenever I imagined sailing, I imagined it on a boat like this.

sailing door county

We sailed on the Talisman, a 1930s restored wooden sailboat. Our captain/skipper (he told me he didn’t think the difference between the two was important, so take your pick) and his wife (could be gf, don’t know for sure) are the type of people who have probably been embodying “cool” for a couple decades. Classic vinyl collection and all. The sailing was laid back, worry free for those of us on board as simple passengers. It wasn’t a tour, but a boat ride. It was kind of refreshing to just sit, watch, and listen to the wind. That said, the skipper was more than happy to answer questions. And teach me about Jackson Browne.

door county sailing

sailing door county

Dad was in charge of steering the boat for the first half of the four-hour tour. (And for those who think learning other languages is difficult, notice that those three words do not rhyme).

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

sailing door county

This was an awesome experience, which made me wish I knew anything about sailing. Some day, some day.

I think the boat itself greatly contributed to the feel of the excursion. Sure, newer boats go faster, but are they as fun to photograph?

After sailing, we returned to Sturgeon Bay, grabbed some pizza and Spotted Cow at Sonny’s Pizza and caught the tail end of open-mike night at the Tambourine. It’s all original, free, and takes place every Thursday around 7ish. We went in with no expectations and were pleased with the level of talent. Although there definitely seemed to be some people who knew each other well (musicians of all ages mingling with hipsters), they were welcoming to us tourists as well. Don’t be surprised if they yell “Sturgeon Buena.” Just go with it.

pizza

Stay tuned for Day 3 and the parents’ second brush with hipsters of the weekend.

Lighthouses and Fish Boils | Door County Day 1

I spent the afternoon at my cousin’s child’s birthday party at a campground near Black River Falls. On the ride there or back (my 28-year-old memory fails me), my aunt mentioned that I must have been a little behind on posting because I haven’t even gotten around to the Door County pictures from over a week ago. I promise that I’m still working my way slowly through an armchair geographer post about what I’ve learned so far about Hmong culture, but since I found myself with a bit of downtime this evening, I couldn’t resist a bit of photo sorting from the trip. Without further ado…

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Last Wednesday through Friday, I went on one of Wisconsin’s quintessential vacations: Door County.

door county beach

It’s known for its beaches (on Lake Michigan), its cherries, its fish boils, its wineries, and its grand ol’ Scandinavian heritage.

Door County is often called the Cape Cod of the Midwest, a name which made me giggle. It’s an exaggeration, to be sure, but the more I learned about the dynamics between locals, wealthy summer residents, and random tourists, the more I could make sense of the comparison. 

door county beach

We made the most of our time on this trip, squeezing many things in to a little bit of time. Unfortunately, we simply didn’t have the time for a week-long relaxing beach trip. But even if we had, the weather would have been a bit chilly for simply lounging and listening to waves.

After arriving in Sturgeon Bay, we headed straight for our hotel. Thankfully, we were able to check in a little early and drop the luggage off. We stayed at the Holiday Music Hotel, which I highly recommend. Lots of character, a recording studio attached, kitschy lobby, simple but decent breakfast, and friendly staff. And the price is lower than all the nearby resorts.

door county holiday music motel

holiday music hotel door county

door county holiday music motel

After checking in, we headed north toward the dry town of Ephraim, where Wilson’s Restaurant and Ice Cream Parlor is located. Between our motel and this restaurant, I was beginning to think that the entire county was some sort of ’50s time warp.

door county wilsons

door county wilson's

I worked in a root beer stand in high school, so I’m quite particular about root beer. Wilson’s makes their own, so I decided to opt for the float as my ice cream treat. And since whitefish is the local specialty, I went for a fish sandwich. This is not your McDonald’s fish sandwich, I assure you.

door county wilsons

door county wilsons rootbeer

After Wilson’s, we wanted to take in something besides calories (culture, for example) and visit one of the county’s well-known Norwegian-style wooden churches: the Boynton Chapel. Tours take place Monday and Thursday from 1-4 PM, but if you arrive a bit late and just want to take pictures, you don’t need to actually join the tour. It’d have been interesting, though. Everywhere you turn, there’s a carving or painting.

boynton chapel door county

door county boynton chapel

boynton chapel door county

boynton chapel door county

door county boynton chapel

door county boynton chapel

door county boynton chapel

cassie.doorcounty 143

We skipped from the chapel to the Cana Island Lighthouse.

Inland, Door County looks like Wisconsin. Along the shore, you can imagine the Cape Cod bit more easily.

door county beach

I got some great photos here, but I have a new computer which keeps flipping portrait view photos, so I’ll save those for another day. (Wait, did you read that?! I finally got a computer!)

door county

cana island lighthouse door county

cana island lighthouse door county

door county

door county cana island

cana island lighthouse door county

door county cana island

door county cana island

After visiting the lighthouse, we didn’t have to much time to kill before our big evening event:

the Door County Fish Boil.

This is a tradition of the county. I knew as soon as we decided to go to Door County that I’d want to do one. But there are over fifteen public ones offered in the county and choosing can be difficult. Luckily, I read Nat Geo Traveler on a regular basis and they included a story in the most recent issue about Door County fish boils. Et voilà, we chose the Old Post Office in Ephraim.

ephraim

ephraim door county

ephraim door county

A fish boil includes onions, potatoes, and whitefish. And a bunch of salt, but they tell us that it boils over and out so you needn’t be alarmed when you see the quantities of salt added. I believed Earl. Because I preferred to.

We arrived about 15 minutes early for the boil and joined our dining companions behind the restaurant.

door county fish boil old post office

fish boil

door county fish boil

door county fish boil

door county fish boil

The fish is boiled while Earl tells fish pun after fish pun for the audience. And just like that, the pot is off, the fire is up, and the diners mosey around to the front of the restaurant to grab their plates and go through the line.

fish boil door county

door county fish boil

I know, it looks like a plate fit for the, well, Midwestern version of a Scandinavian palate. But it was really good fish (the servers come around to remove the bones in it for you), the bread is decent, and the coleslaw rivals your grandmother’s.

It also comes with a nice view.

door county fish boil

I was happy.

fish boil

It also comes with your very own slice of Door County cherry pie. Ice cream is a bit extra, but made locally.

cherry pie a la mode door county

We lingered a little before returning back to the hotel for the night. There was a view of the sunset on the lake. Who would want to leave right away?

Day 2 recap coming soon….